Thursday, February 17, 2011

oral storytelling- the three billy goats gruff



I thought I'd share with you some of the benefits of oral storytelling:

* it centers young children and brings them into a moment of quiet calm
* it fosters imagination and fantasy
* it communicates values, principles and life challenges and difficulties
* it introduces new vocabulary, especially a range of adjectives that young children aren't often exposed to
* it presents heroes ad heroines, protagonists and antagonists to a child that they can emulate and mimic
* it develops creative thinking and exemplifies empathy, compassion, initiative, and taking action
* it the story’s images and characters a child holds in their mind are transformable and mutable and able to develop and change over time with the child (as opposed to tv and movie images where every detail is set in stone and there is no room for interpretation)
* it is different than reading because the storyteller brings a part of his/her own personal interpretation into it when it is memorised

Last week I shared the story of Chicken Licken. This week I told, The Three Billy Goats Gruff which has a few simple lessons: work together to solve problems and reap rewards and bullies never win. I made the characters with modelling beeswax combined with leftover beeswax from candles around the house. Enjoy!

The Three Billy Goats Gruff


Once upon a time there were three billy goats gruff. Big Billy Goat Gruff, Middle Billy Goat Gruff and Little Billy Goat Gruff. They all lived on a big mountain top. One day the goats looked over the mountain and across the river and saw a green pasture filled with lovely grass. They thought they might like to eat that grass, but to get across the river they had to go over a bridge. And do you know who lived under that bridge? A great big, mean, hairy TROLL! And do you know what trolls eat? Billy goats!


So, the goats put their heads together and came up with a plan. The next morning, the Littlest Billy Goat Gruff set off towards the bridge. Trip trop, trip trop trip trop. As he trotted onto the bridge the troll jumped up from underneath, and growled,"Who's that crossing my bridge? I'm going to eat you up!".
But Little Billy Goat said, "Oh, don't eat me! I'm so small and bony. My brother will be coming by here soon and he is much bigger and fatter than I am. Wait until he comes by and eat him instead."
The troll thought for a minute and then agreed. "But hurry up before I change my mind!" he scowled. So the Little Billy Goat Gruff crossed the bridge safely and went to eat the lush green grass in the pasture.

Next it was the Middle Billy Goat Gruff's turn. He set off towards the bridge. Trip trop, trip trop trip trop. As he trotted onto the bridge the troll jumped up from underneath, and growled, "Who's that crossing my bridge? I'm going to eat you up!".
But the Middle Billy Goat Gruff replied, "Oh, don't eat me! I'm really not that big a billy goat. My brother will be passing by here soon and he is much bigger and fatter than I am. Wait until he comes by, he'll be a much more satisfying meal."
The troll thought for a minute and then agreed. "But hurry up before I change my mind!" he scowled. So, Middle Billy Goat Gruff trotted off the bridge and joined his brother to eat the green grass.


Next it was the Biggest Billy Goat Gruff's turn. He set off towards the bridge. Trip trop, trip trop trip trop. As he trotted onto the bridge the troll jumped up from underneath, and growled "Who's that crossing my bridge? I'm going to...." But before the troll could finish what he was saying, the Biggest Billy Goat Gruff lowered his head and horns and galloped towards the troll. He knocked the troll into the river and the troll floated away and was never seen again! Then the Biggest Billy Goat Gruff trotted off the bridge and happily joined his brothers and they all ate lots and lots of delicious green grass.

xo m.

5 comments:

Meg said...

We read a lot of books but I've never thought to act out a story like this (and we have most of the same props too). Thanks for the inspiration!

emily said...

What fun! My husband has an old recording of his brother and his dad acting out the different parts of the billy goats and the troll. You can take oral storytelling in so many interesting directions.

Amanda Browning said...

A beautiful and imaginative way to share stories! I love your natural props and characters.

Rochelle's Lenz said...

I am really seeing the impact that oral story telling has on our little ones at our waldorf playgroup. I love the rhythm it gives as well as connection. I am going to be brave and integrate this with the props I will create and te reo and tikanga (NZs indigenous language and culture) using my sisters stories which she is writing for her classes at her local Waldorf school, at our local playcentre. Really looking forward to it.

Anonymous said...

Hello, i just sent a long comment here and then made the mistake of looking at antother page and bingo ....gone!!third time lucky. i love what you wrote and i am fascinated to read about the meandering path of your life and study. I work in early childhood education in new zealand and i wanted to let you know about my face book page which i created as a result of my fascination with the benefits of oral storytelling. i have posted your page about the billy goats gruff cos it is very good. thank you. And i wanted to invite you to visit, maybe like, maybe share with others my attempts to spread the word on oral storytelling. ....it is called storytelling threads because i also make felted story mats and the like..... https://www.facebook.com/storytellingthreads my warmest regards, do you live in sydney? my email is evadiva@xtra.co.nz

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